Exciting opportunity in the Genomics and Microbiology Lab at NC Museum of Natural Sciences

As many of you know, we partner with the awesome folks in the Genomics and Microbiology Lab at the NC Museum of Natural Sciences on a number of public science projects: belly button biodiversity, armpit microbes, face mites and soon soil microbes (as part of our new Students Discover education project).

With so much public science and more, they’re looking for a little help on the research and science communication front.

Below is an advertisement for a one-year Research and Outreach Coordinator position – They’re looking for a dynamo with a background in molecular […]

By |November 19th, 2013|armpits, Belly Button Biodiversity, Education, Jobs, Uncategorized|1 Comment

Post Docs Wanted!

We’re looking for a few good post docs, excited about the prospect of bringing real science to middle school classrooms.

These new post docs will be based at the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences and will work with the outstanding team of scientists and educators we’ve assembled for our new Students Discover project.

The big goal of Students Discover is to integrate real science with education, and the applicant must have enthusiasm and interest, if not experience and training, in both fields.  Post docs will work collaboratively with educators to develop citizen science projects around authentic research in […]

By |October 3rd, 2013|Education, Jobs, Your Wild Life Team|0 Comments

Undergraduate interested in urban biodiversity? We have the job for YOU!

Our lab has been busy, BUSY these last few months studying urban arthropod biodiversity. Post-doc Amy Savage led not one, but TWO expeditions to New York City to study the ants living in roadside medians and urban parks. Post-doc Elsa Youngsteadt has been trekking up and down the East Coast sampling arthropods on red maple  trees growing along the streets of Raleigh, Baltimore, New York City, and Boston.

Now that field work is complete for the season, Amy and Elsa need help sorting, counting and identifying the arthropods they’ve collected. They’re seeking a student laboratory […]

By |October 23rd, 2012|Jobs, Projects, Your Wild Life Team|0 Comments

**UPDATED** Want to work in your backyard or bedroom? We’re looking for 2 new post-docs

**We originally posted March 23, 2012. Note that the Your Wild Life Postdoc position AND the School of Ants Postdoc position have now been officially posted on the NCSU website.**

The camel crickets in our basement are jumping. Ants are busy foraging in our backyard. Both the birds and carpenter bees are furiously building nests in and around our house.

Spring has ARRIVED.

As the wild life around us starts cranking with the onset of spring, so too is research in the Dunn Lab.

And we’re looking for a couple new post-docs to join our crack team of scientists, communicators, […]

By |April 17th, 2012|Jobs, Your Wild Life Team|2 Comments

But wait, there’s MORE

In addition to two postdocs and a lab manager (coming soon), we are looking for field technicians to sample ants and scale insects in cities across the east coast of the U.S. (e.g., ants on Broadway).

If you are interested in working in the summer to collect and study ants in the city (and then doing broad collection of several species more generally), contact Steve Frank (steven_frank AT ncsu.edu; Frank Lab website). Please send your CV, a paragraph or two about your experience collecting in the field (and/or with specimen curation), and contact info for three potential reference […]

By |March 27th, 2012|Jobs, Your Wild Life Team|0 Comments

Want to study the consequences of urban and global warming for plant-arthropod interactions? [Post-doc Opp]

Our pal and collaborator Steve Frank in the Entomology Department at NCSU is advertising a post-doctoral position (available immediately) to study the consequences of urban heat islands and global climate change on arthropods of conservation, economic, or human health importance.

In other words, how do insects respond to the increased temperatures associated with inner city living? And what, in turn, might be the consequences of those changes in their physiology, life cycle and ecology on the plants those insects eat?

So far Steve and collaborators have detected a significant urban heat island effect in Manhattan and Raleigh, where […]

By |February 17th, 2012|Jobs, Projects, Video|0 Comments
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